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The summer holidays are almost over and children will be heading back to school. We all want to make sure they get to and from school safely and the activities selected below could be used in the classroom for Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 pupils.

 

  1. Carry out a questionnaire within the class, or the whole school, to find out how every child gets to school. Graph the results.
  2. Ask the children to list methods of making an area safe, for example pedestrian crossings, road signs etc. Using photographs or pictures made by the children make a display.
  3. Ask the children to list various traffic hazards that they might encounter on their way to school, for example cars parked in no parking zones, children crossing the road between parked cars etc.
  4. Ask the children to draw a map of their route to school. Ask them to identify any hazards en route or any features which have been carried out to improve safety. Mark these on the map.
  5. Look at the area in the immediate vicinity of the school. Using a map or large scale aerial photograph plot features such as road signs, pelican crossing, pedestrian crossing, speed humps or any other features which have been put outside the school to reduce the speed of traffic.
  6. The number of cars bringing children to school is a problem nationwide. Try to carry out a traffic count first thing in the morning or at the end of the day to see how many cars drop children off immediately outside the school or in the school car park. Carry this out several times in different weather conditions. Does the volume stay the same or vary according to the weather?
  7. As a school, what methods have you adopted, or plan to adopt to reduce the traffic congestion and improve safety outside the school?
  8. How could you encourage more children to walk or cycle to school?

 

Wildgoose related resources:

Safe routes to school photopack download

Safe routes to school photopack

Large aerial photograph, site centred

Aeroimage deskmats, site centred

The 2016 Olympic Games are now in full swing in Rio and GB are set to have their best away games yet!

If you are thinking of ways to incorporate the Olympics in to your classroom, we’ve put together a few ideas to help you inspire your pupils and take advantage of the learning opportunities the Games present.

Geography

  • Use a world map to plot the host nations for the modern Olympics, which started in 1896.
  • Plan a viewing programme of Olympic events around Brazil and plan the routes to get there.
  • Divide the class or school into groups and allocate each one a country that is participating in the Olympics. They should find out as much as they can about their country, its geography, history and culture and create a report, which they present to the class or school, possibly in the form of a documentary or as a tourist information publication.
  • Work out which team has to travel the furthest to get to Rio.
  • Allocate each child a participating country and ask them to locate it on a world map. Then ask the class to group themselves as if on a world map, initially just in the correct continents. As a further challenge they could try to position themselves correctly in relation to each other – you might need to go outside or use the hall for this one!
  • Learn some basic phrases from competing nations. These could include: Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thank You, Yes, No. Make a poster to help you learn them.

Science

  • Record pulse rates before and after participating in different types of sport. Can you devise a fair test? Is one type of sport better for you than another? What criteria would you use?
  • All sports people use certain muscles to perform their sport to the best of their ability. Committed sports people train hard every day, eat balanced diets and generally look after themselves. Investigate how muscles work in the body.

English

  • Creative writing – write a mystery story set around the Olympics in Rio. It could involve competitors or spectators, or both, and it should include at least one description of an Olympic event.
  • Write a sports report, either for a real or imaginary event.
  • Choose one of the ancient Olympic events and write a description of it for someone who has never seen it. Imagine you are in the crowd and writing home to your tell your family about your adventure to this Ancient Olympics (think about sights, smells, sounds etc)
  • Using our own national anthem, write some alternative lyrics to give it a sporting theme.

Art & Design

  • Design a flag and athletics kit for an imaginary country.
  • Design a logo or a poster to promote sport in school.
  • Design a training shoe for a chosen sport. Explain how your design would help the athlete to improve their performance.
  • Design a poster to promote Olympic values in your school.
  • Make an Olympic torch – cut the bottom off a plastic bottle, cover the bottle with foil and add red, yellow and orange tissue-paper flames.
  • Design your own set of Olympic medals – gold, silver and bronze. What would you show on either side of each medal.

Maths

  • Create a database of current world and Olympic records in all the Olympic sports.
  • Look at distances, heights and lengths and times of some of the Olympic records. Use this information to set simple calculations such as:

What is the total length of all the ‘throwing’ events?

What is the difference between the men’s marathon winner and the women’s?

If all the jumping events were added together (both height and length) what distance would be covered?

How much further is the men’s compared to the women’s result?

How fast on average were each of the relay runners running?

If you add together all the distance track events for either the men or women, how many laps round the stadium would these amount to? (The stadium track is 400m once round).

The Olympics is also a great opportunity to highlight the Olympic values of excellence, friendship and respect. The official Olympic website offers lots of information about the history of the Games plus current sports and athletes.

Due to tectonic shifts, the entire continent of Australia has moved 1.5 metres north over the past 22 years, putting it out of sync with GPS.

To fix this, Australia is going to adjust its official latitude and longitude, putting the majority of the country back into alignment with the world’s GPS systems.

Tectonic plates are the Earth’s crust broken up into about 12 plates of rock which float on magma (molten rock). Currents in the magma move these plates slowly in different directions. Earthquakes occur along the boundaries of these plates. Earthquakes, which are caused by a build-up of tension between tectonic plates, change the structure of landmasses and the sea floor and can shift continents in moments.

Wildgoose related resources:

Tectonic Plates Poster

Australia Poster

Wipeable Coordinates Grid

Volcanoes Photopack

Earthquakes Photopack

 

 

Taken from our popular Roald Dahl Poster and Teaching guide, below are question ideas for children about the Roald Dahl books they have read.

1 Many of Roald Dahl’s stories involve the characters going on journeys. Write about two or three of these journeys from different books and say what purpose they serve in the books.

2 Dahl’s stories are very popular with children but many adults object to them, saying that there is too much cruelty, violence and rudeness in his books. Do you think that the adults have a point?

3 Some people think that Roald Dahl’s stories are rather like fairy stories, with characters who are either very good or very bad. Is that true? Are there any books where the characters are not so clear-cut?

4 What sort of things do you admire in Roald Dahl’s books? Give examples from titles you have read. Many people think he is brilliantly inventive with his plots and language and that he is often very witty. Is this what you like? What else attracts you to his books?

5 One of the aspects of Roald Dahl’s books that readers enjoy is the way that he gets going with the story really quickly. Is this true of all books? Look at the openings of some of them and share your findings.

6 How many of Dahl’s characters are children who have to survive without their parents, or with awful parents? Do you think children like books where the parents are absent or horrible? Why?

7 Have you seen any films of Dahl’s books? What was enjoyable about the film(s) and what differences were there from the books?

8 Do you talk to your friends about the Roald Dahl books that you read? What aspects do you usually share with each other?

9 Have you found anything out about Roald Dahl’s life, especially about his early life as a child? Do you think you can understand more about some aspects of his books when you know more about him as a person?

10 Which is your favourite Dahl title and why?

11 Quentin Blake’s illustrations can be found in nearly all of Dahl’s books. How do they add to your experience of reading the books?

12 Some of the early versions of Dahl’s books were not illustrated by Quentin Blake but by other illustrators. For instance, Jill Bennett illustrated Fantastic Mr Fox and Danny the Champion of the World and Faith Jaques illustrated Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. If you can get hold of these early versions, it is very interesting to see how their illustrations compare with those of Quentin Blake. Take two or three key moments and see how each illustrator approaches the drawing.

Teaching activities are also available for Fantastic Mr Fox, Esio Trot, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Danny the Champion of the World, Matilda and the BFG with our Poster and teachers guide.

Now available on our website! The only washable, wearable, all-weather fabric maps. Centred on your school or local area! All we need is your postcode.

Designed for the real outdoors, these unique products are ideal for local area studies, nature walks, outside classrooms, adventure days and more! They can be used to identify routes, places of local interest and to navigate your local area. The only map that can be kept in your pocket or worn whilst not in use!

OS and Aerial versions are available.

2016 marks 100 years since the birth of Roald Dahl. Throughout 2016, there will be celebrations for Roald Dahl 100.

Roald Dahl was born in 1916 in Wales of Norwegian parents. His father died when he was four and Dahl was sent to boarding school at the tender age of eight.

The experience was harsh for the boy and aspects such as punishment and neglect can be seen to have coloured much of his adult writing. Dahl writes about this early and later school life in Boy (1984). As a young adult, he began working for the Shell
Oil Company in Africa. During the Second World War, as an RAF fighter pilot, he was shot down and severely injured. This experience, however, seemed to kick-start his wish to write and, in 1942, he began a writing career that was to last until his death in 1990.

Based on the beloved children’s classic by Roald Dahl, “The BFG” movie will be released at the cinema this Friday so below we share a subtraction with teaching activities from our popular Roald Dahl Author Profile Poster and Teaching guide 

In the middle of the night, at the ‘witching hour’, Sophie, aged eight, living in an orphanage, cannot sleep. She goes to the window and, to her amazement, sees an enormously tall, thin giant coming down the street. Every now and again he stops to blow through a trumpet-like tube into the windows of the sleepers in the houses. The BFG, for it is he, is aware that Sophie has seen him and he ‘kidsnatches’ her. He flies with her, wrapped tightly in her blanket, across acres of land back to his own country. Sophie fears she will become the giant’s breakfast but he is not like the other giants, nine in number, who are his neighbours. He is not a man-gobbling cannybull; he does not eat human beans. He does, however speak, in an extraordinary way that Sophie has to adjust to. She also has much to learn about him and, eventually, when the BFG feels he can trust her, he tells her that he is a dream-catcher, collector and blower of dreams. His life is not happy, however, with his giant neighbours who bully and terrify him and his limited diet of disgusting snozzcumbers, and now he has also to ensure that Sophie is not at risk from them. Sophie is appalled to hear of the giants’ nightly expeditions to eat humans and, before long, she hits on a plan to enlist the Queen of England in a daring scheme to end the nine giants’ reign of terror. Having watched the BFG administer a nightmare of a dream to one of the giants, Sophie gets him to mix up a very specific dream to be blown into the Queen’s ear whilst she is sleeping in her bedroom at Buckingham Palace. Back to England they fly and all goes to plan. The Queen awakes, having learnt in her dream of the ravages of the giants, and there on her windowsill is Sophie as she knew she would be from her dream. Sophie confirms the dream, the BFG is brought in from the Palace garden and introduced, and, after a full breakfast, not of snozzcumbers, the Army and the Air Force are brought in. Before long, nine helicopters are on their way, following the BFG, back to Giant country. The nine giants are trussed up, slung below the helicopters, transported back to England and dumped in the deepest pit from where they cannot escape. Their diet is to be snozzcumbers and nothing else. The BFG and Sophie have special homes built for them in Windsor Great Park and the BFG becomes a writer, writing in fact the book of his adventures with Sophie which the reader has just read but which has been published under another’s name.

Ideas for classroom work (After a general summary of the book)

1 What most people remember about the story of the BFG is the extraordinary language that Roald Dahl invented for the giants to talk in. The list below gives some of the ways in which he has made up the language, with examples. Put in as many more examples from the book as you can whilst you are reading. Are there any other ways in which Roald Dahl plays around with the language?

  • He uses single verbs instead of plurals,
    ‘Giants is everywhere around.’
  • He hardly ever uses ‘are’ and ‘am’,
    ‘You is making me sad’, ‘I is the one who
    kidsnatched you’.
  • He uses ‘is’ and the ‘-ing’ form of the
    verb instead of the ordinary present or
    past tense, ‘Every morning I is going
    out and snitching new dreams to put in
    my bottles.’
  • He takes common expressions, such as
    ‘nosy parker’, and uses them in totally
    new ways, ‘Now you is getting nosier
    than a parker’.
  • He spells some words as they sound
    rather than with conventional spelling,
    ‘langwitch’, ‘human bean’.
  • He misuses common expressions. We
    all know the expression ‘not to be
    sneezed at’ but the BFG says ‘not to be
    coughed at’.
  • He makes up words, rather like other
    words but just a little bit wrong,
    ‘moocheling and footcheling’ instead of
    ‘mooching and footling’.
  • He uses the wrong words but ones that
    sound close to the right word, ‘the
    frisby north’ (‘the freezing north’), ‘rotten
    wool’ (‘cotton wool’).
  • He makes up new plurals for nouns,
    ‘micies’.
  • He rhymes words with some common
    expressions, ‘skin and groans’ instead
    of ‘skin and bones’, ‘gun and flames’
    instead of ‘fun and games’.
  • He exchanges syllables between words,
    ‘catasterous disastrophe’ instead of
    ‘disastrous catastrophe’, ‘curdbloodling’
    instead of ‘bloodcurdling’.
  • He uses the wrong prefixes, ‘unpossible’.
  • And of course, he makes up totally new
    words, ‘whizzpopping’.

2 Using the list above and looking at any other examples you have found, write a
conversation between Sophie and the BFG, with the giant talking in his own special
way. They could be talking about anything.

3 Reread the chapter entitled ‘The Bloodbottler’. This is one of those chapters that Roald Dahl writes so well, making our pulse rates increase when we know how much danger one of the characters is in and when we know that another character is doing just the opposite of what he should do. It’s a bit like being at a antomime when we want to call out, ‘No! Don’t do it!’ Of all the things that happen to Sophie, nothing is quite so horrible as what happens to her in this chapter. Write the thoughts of Sophie as she goes through the various stages of her ordeal, from the moment when she scuttles behind the snozzcumber when the Bloodbottler comes into the BFG’s cave to the moment when she crawls, half-stunned, under the hem of the BFG’s cloak.

4 Look back at the chapter called ‘Dreams’. Sophie goes along the giant’s shelves reading the labels on his dream bottles. Make up a few more labels for dreams that you would – or wouldn’t – like to have. Remember good dreams are ‘phizzwizards’ and bad dreams are ‘trogglehumpers’.

5 The scenes at Buckingham Palace are usually enjoyed immensely by readers. Of course, the maid, Mary, and the butler, Mr Tibbs, will have a great many things to tell each other when things finally get a bit quieter. Imagine them sitting in the royal kitchens sharing their views on the events of the day. Write a conversation between them.

6 Although most of this book is good knockabout fun, there are some serious parts. The BFG really fears being caught and put on exhibition in a sort of zoo; he hates the idea of Sophie being locked in a cellar in the orphanage; he is bullied by the nine giants in a very upsetting way and then Roald Dahl also wants us to think about why it is only human beings, of all creatures, who kill their own kind. What serious things did the book make you think about? Do you think it adds to a book if it is not all lighthearted. Write down your views.

Teaching activities are also available for Fantastic Mr Fox, Esio Trot, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Danny the Champion of the World and Matilda with our poster and teachers guide. 

 

Plan or record your daily summer holiday activities with our free holiday planner.

Just click or copy and paste the link below in to your web browser.

http://download.bluesky-world.com/files/WebsiteDownloads/eCats/Wildgoose-Summer%20Holiday%20Planner.pdf

Happy holidays!

wildgoose-summer-holiday-planner

Are you all set for the summer holidays? If you are in need of activity ideas, we have just a few below to help you with your planning.

1: Cinema Day – Everyone pays the kids price at Kids AM Vue Cinemas. Keep the kids amused from only £1.99 for adult and child tickets on selected movies every Saturday and Sunday morning and every day in school holidays. Odeon and Cineworld also do similar offers. 

2: Bowling – Great fun for everyone! Take in the party atmosphere, enjoy the tunes and see Tenpin bowling offers here .

3: Free Events – Discover free and not-for-profit local activities for families, kids and all ages here.

4: Water fight – 25 water games and activities to choose from!

5: Pottery Painting: Discover how much fun painting ceramics can be. Find a studio near you to paint your very own piece of pottery.

6: Messy Play: Create a mini garden -fill a tray with soil and design your own garden. Body painting – use child friendly paints and get creative with body art. Water play – add food colouring to water and use with toys and bottles for squirty fun. Big art – Roll out any left over wall paper and let imaginations run wild. Bubbles – Make your own with washing up liquid and see what tools you can use to make big bubbles. Sticking – rip up magazines, old birthday cards, fabrics and colourful paper and create your own collages with glitter and sequins. Paper Mache heads – easy to make with newspaper, a balloon and some glue.

7: Outdoor and indoor activities – The National Trust has some great ideas to help you along the way!

8: Trip to the seaside – Grab your bucket and spade and head off to the beach.

9: Take in some History – Free Museums in the UK just waiting to be explored.

10: Have a duvet day – Spend the day in your PJ’s, put on a film, eat some ice cream and chill for the day. Why not download  our catalogue and prepare lessons with resources delivered for when you return to school?

11: Trampoline park – This is becoming a very popular activity with new sites opening across the UK.

12: Go for a picnic – Enjoy the fresh air and head off to your nearest picnic spot.

Whatever you decide to do, we hope you have fun!

The next Beep Beep! day takes place on 13th July. The day is designed to help children learn the basics of road safety through fun activities, while raising awareness to protect children on our roads.

We have a range of activities, taken from our safe routes to school photopack, that you could use on the day to encourage and promote safe journeys to and from school.

  1. Carry out a questionnaire within the class, or the whole school, to find out how
    every child gets to school. Graph the results.
  2. Ask the children to list methods of making an area safe, for example pedestrian
    crossings, road signs etc. Using photographs or pictures made by the children make a
    display.
  3. Ask the children to list various traffic hazards that they might encounter on
    their way to school, for example cars parked in no parking zones, children crossing
    the road between parked cars etc.
  4. Ask the children to draw a map of their route to school. Ask them to identify any
    hazards en route or any features which have been carried out to improve safety.
    Mark these on the map.
  5. Look at the area in the immediate vicinity of the school. Using a map or largescale
    aerial photograph plot features such as road signs, pelican crossing, pedestrian
    crossing, speed humps or any other features which have been put outside the school
    to reduce the speed of traffic.
  6. The number of cars bringing children to school is a problem nationwide. Try to
    carry out a traffic count first thing in the morning or at the end of the day to see
    how many cars drop children off immediately outside the school or in the school car
    park. Carry this out several times in different weather conditions. Does the volume
    stay the same or vary according to the weather?
  7. As a school, what methods have you adopted, or plan to adopt to reduce the
    traffic congestion and improve safety outside the school?
  8. How could you encourage more children to walk or cycle to school?

These activities can be used or adapted to suit Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 pupils.

 

The longest day of the year will happen on 21st June. It is known as the longest day of the year because it is when the tilt of Earth’s axis is most inclined towards the sun, and that’s why we get the most daylight of the year.

People will celebrate by visiting the ancient Monument Stonehenge where they will see the sun set on 20 June 9.26pm and rise like a blazing fire at 4.52am on Tuesday 21 June.

Stonehenge is perhaps the world’s most famous prehistoric monument. It was built in several stages: the first monument built approximately 5,000 years ago, and the stone circle was erected 2500 BC – the late Neolithic period.

 

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